William H.A. Willbond MSM, CD

A SMALL VICTORY REPORTED

I worry about my brother Bobby who is traveling far
He is going down from Kabul to inspect Kandahar
In the news Canadians they now pound Taliban bomb makers
Canada’s troops are continuing to be the movers and shakers

A small victory is reported on page eleven of the Times
The front page was reserved for local murders and crimes
The Al-Qaeda and Hezbollah are both mentioned in brief
Muslims killing each other – causing great Islamic grief

The silent majority of Muslims have still not spoken out
In fear of Jihad and their own son’s actions, no doubt?
Al-Qaeda suicide bombers continue plans for a strike
Attacking the weakest Infidels like a thief in the night

As an old veteran I would love to be able to turn the other cheek
But the spoils of solid victory are never inherited by the meek
To show other than accomplishments being strong and not weak
Will ensure that the Taliban and Al-Qaeda will go down to defeat!

Best to meet the enemy in the Desert and not the Toronto street
CSIS and the RCMP have to listen and go undercover real deep
For when our own home grown sleeper cells they no longer sleep
We will fight them here at home when there’s no peace to keep!

Author’s Note: Inspired by the Times Colonist Articles of June 1, 2008 (reproduced below)

CANADIANS POUND TALIBAN IN ASSAULT ON BOMBMAKERS

Operation Rolling Thunder entailed most intense combat this year, commander says

DOUG SCHMIDT: CanWest News Service

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Canadian and Afghan forces have completed a four-day assault on insurgent networks building and deploying improvised explosive devices in the Pashmul area west of Kandahar City.

Roadside IEDs or suicide bombings have been behind more than half of the 83 Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan.

The operation to disrupt the work of the roadside bombers — Operation Rawa Tunder (Pashto for Rolling Thunder) — saw the heaviest fighting so far this year by the Canadian battle group and Afghan security forces. The fighting was so intense at times that artillery and U.S. aerial bombing missions were called in.

“It was aimed at disrupting some of the cells that have been affecting some of the routes [used by Canadian convoys]. It was a successful operation,” said Lt.-Col. Shawn Lockhurst, chief of operations with Canada’s Joint Task Force Afghanistan headquarters.

“It keeps them off balance… it keeps them guessing,” he said. “They will remain off balance for the foreseeable future and have less co-ordination to conduct attacks.”

Dozens of insurgents were killed in the fighting, but Lockhurst would not say exactly how many nor would he comment on Afghan media that a local Taliban commander was killed in the fighting.

“We don’t measure successes by body counts, but should we happen to eliminate commanders… that is a success,” he said.

No Canadians were injured and the only Afghan National Army casualty was a soldier who shot himself in the foot.

The operation, which wasn’t revealed by the military until its conclusion, was conducted in an area where Canadians have frequently fought it out with the Taliban, winning battles in the group’s birthplace only to witness the insurgents flow back in after the foreign soldiers pulled out.

“At this point, I wouldn’t speculate that it’s free of Taliban,” said Lockhurst. In a counter-insurgency fight, he said, “it’s a very fluid battlefield.”

Lockhurst described the targeted IED networks as “fairly sophisticated operations.” Operation Rawa Tunder was part of a much larger, ongoing campaign by International Security Assistance Forces to go after those behind the IED and suicide bomber attacks.

“In this past month it has been a determined effort to tackle these networks and it has paid dividends… we have made an impact,” said Lockhurst. The month of May also saw a surge in bicycles being used for bombings, with nine such IED attacks against Afghan and foreign security forces.

Fears of suicide bombers or IED strikes has forced Canada’s military – led reconstruction effort in Kandahar to proceed at a slower pace than desired, with development project officers only venturing out to village destinations under heavy military escort.

“It was an operation basically to neutralize them,” Canadian Battle Group Planning Officer Maj. Fraser Auld said. “The insurgent networks wield influence much the same way the gangs wield their influence — intimidation,” with the locals having little ability to resist.

“The key… is taking out the network facilitators, the folks… that plan it, that pay the bills, “ said Lockhurst, adding those doing the actual bomb planting “are the low-level actors, just trying to make a living.”

AL-QAEDA CLAIMS REFINERY ATTACK

DUBAI — An al Qaeda-linked group claimed responsibility yesterday for a mortar attack on a refinery in Yemen, which officials said did not cause any damage. “Al-Qaeda carried out the blessed operation with three mortar shells… on the refinery used by Yemen’s despot to supply fuel to the Crusaders in their war against Islam,” the group said on an Islamist website. – Reuters

LEBANESE TROOPS KILL BOMBER

SIDON, Lebanon — Lebanese soldiers shot dead a man carrying explosives strapped around his body as he left a Palestinian refugee camp in south Lebanon, security sources said. They said soldiers manning a checkpoint stopped a car and when they asked its occupants for identification papers, a man fled on foot. The soldiers opened fire and killed the man only to find the explosives as they approached his body. – Reuters

ROADSIDE BLAST KILLS THREE IN IRAQ

BAQUBA— Three people, including a child, were killed and seven wounded in a roadside bomb attack in the Iraqi town of Baquba yesterday, the U.S. military said. Two weeks ago, a woman suicide bomber killed another woman and wounded 16 people in an attack aimed at the Sons of Iraq, a group of mostly Sunni former insurgents who switched sides. – AFP

MAN DIES IN RELIGIOUS CLASH

MINYA, Egypt — One Muslim man was killed and four Coptic Christians, including two monks, were injured yesterday when a land dispute involving a historic monastery in Egypt turned violent, a security official said.

Khalil Ibrahim Mohammed, a Muslim resident of a town neighbouring the Abu Fana monastery near the southern city of Minya, was killed during clashes with Christians, the official said. Two Coptic Christian workers suffered gunshot wounds. – AFP